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Anti-doping

We believe all athletes have the right to compete in sport knowing that they, and their competitors, are clean. In pursuit of clean canoeing, British Canoeing works in partnership with UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) and the International Canoe Federation (ICF) to ensure that the integrity of our sport is protected.

The use of performance-enhancing drugs and other doping behaviour severely damages the legitimacy of sport and undermines the integrity of clean athletes.

Anti-doping rules

British Canoeing has in place a set of anti-doping rules that all athletes, coaches and athlete support personnel must abide by. The anti-doping rules for British Canoeing are consistent with the World Anti-Doping Code (2015), which governs anti-doping internationally.

You can find the following Anti-Doping rules below. These rules came into effect on 1st January 2015:

British Canoeing adopts the UK Anti-Doping Rules published by UK Anti-Doping (or its successor, as amended from time to time). Such rules shall take effect and be construed as the rules of British Canoeing.

If you are a member of British Canoeing, then the anti-doping rules apply to you regardless of what level you participate at. For Information on the 2015 Code changes including the Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) please download the relevant documents from the panel on the right. Below we have highlighted several areas of Anti-Doping which all athletes and support staff should familiarise themselves with.

100% me – Supporting Athletes to be Clean

100% me is UK Anti-Doping’s education programme for athletes that provides information resources, education sessions and general advice to athletes throughout their sporting careers.

Find out about 100% me in the dedicated Athlete Zone of the UKAD website.

What is Strict Liability?

All athletes need to be aware of the principle of strict liability. This means that all athletes are solely responsible for any banned substance they use, attempt to use, or that is found in their system, regardless of how it got there and whether or not they had an intention to cheat.

It is crucial that athletes check all medications are safe to take prior to use. Medications can be checked online via Global DRO.

Athletes must undertake thorough internet research of any supplement products before use – including the name of the product and the ingredients/substances listed. Information revealed as a result should be further investigated and we advise athletes to keep evidence of their search.

Managing Inadvertent Doping Risks

All banned substances and methods in code-compliant sports are outlined in the Prohibited List, which is updated at the beginning of every calendar year, but may also be updated throughout the year. As of 1st January, WADA has released an updated version of the Prohibited List for 2016. Please find details of these changes here.

Understand the Importance of Checking Medications

Before taking any medication, whether from a doctor or bought over the counter, athletes must check to make sure it does not contain any banned substances. Medications can be checked online at Global DRO. It is important to note that medications bought in one country may contain different ingredients to the same branded medication in another country.

Know the Risks with Nutritional Supplements

Athletes are strongly advised to be very cautious if they choose to take any supplement such as vitamin tablets, energy drinks, or sport-nutrition formulas. This is because there is no guarantee that any supplement is free from banned substances.

All athletes are advised to:

  • assess the need to use supplements by seeking advice from a medical professional or nutritionist
  • assess the risks associated with supplements and undertake thorough research of all supplement products they are considering taking
  • assess the consequences to their careers - before making a decision to use supplements, as use of prohibited supplements could result in a four year ban

However, supplement risks can be reduced by:

  • undertaking thorough internet research
  • only using batch-tested products
  • checking on Informed-Sport (a risk minimisation programme) that the supplement has been batch tested

Visit the UKAD website for further information including information on the Informed Sport programme, which provides a batch-testing service for supplement products.

Apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE)

Athletes who need to use a banned substance or method to treat a genuine medical condition, and there are no reasonable alternatives, may have to apply for a TUE.

  • International-level athletes (as defined by the ICF) need to apply to the ICF for a TUE
  • Athletes competing at National level need to apply to UKAD for a TUE

Athletes who have an existing TUE issued by UKAD do not need to reapply for a new TUE when becoming an International-Level Athlete. They should however, provide the ICF with a copy of their TUE to ensure it is recognised.

Athletes listed under the ‘National’ category for their sport must apply for their TUE in advance of competing. The ‘National’ category for TUEs is defined by UKAD Sport and can be found on UKAD’s website. Only in an emergency situation or where there will be a severe impact on health should treatment begin without the necessary approval.

You can find out more about whether you need a TUE and how to apply for one (including emergency TUEs) on the UKAD website.

Help Keep Sport Clean

We all have a responsibility to report doping in sport and help keep it clean. A 24-hour dedicated phone line, hosted by Crimestoppers, is ready to take your call if you have any suspicions or concerns about incidences of doping in sport. You can provide information in complete confidence by calling 08000 32 23 32 or via a secure website. All information is passed securely to UKAD’s intelligence unit for investigation.

​British Canoeing’s Anti Doping Liaison Officer (ADLO)

Gemma Wiggs, International Affairs Manager

Mobile: 0770 2568 673

Email: gemma.wiggs@britishcanoeing.org.uk

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